Cancer-research

Virtual clinical trials use mathematical modelling to predict melanoma response

Researchers from Moffitt Cancer Center’s Integrated Mathematical Oncology (IMO) Department are overcoming the limitations of common preclinical experiments and clinical trials by studying cancer through mathematical modeling. A study led by Alexander “Sandy” Anderson, Ph.D., chair of IMO, and Eunjung Kim, Ph.D., an applied research scientist, shows how mathematical modeling can accurately predict patient responses …

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Researchers use multi-task deep neural networks to automatically extract data from cancer pathology reports

Despite steady progress in detection and treatment in recent decades, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, cutting short the lives of approximately 500,000 people each year. To better understand and combat this disease, medical researchers rely on cancer registry programs–a national network of organizations that systematically collect demographic and …

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Multi drug resistant cancer is associated with loss of TP53TG1 molecule

A new study by researchers at the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) has found a cause of multiple resistance in cancer chemotherapy. They discovered that 10% of colon and stomach tumors present wit loss of a molecule called TP53TG1. The functionof TP53TG1 is to prevent activation of YBX1 protein. Without surveillance of TP53TG1 in these …

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New method to study RNA G-quadruplexes to understand their role in cancer

An international research team led by the University of Leicester has made a breakthrough advance in understanding about RNA that could pave a new route for the development of anti-cancer drugs. This research is published in Nature Chemical Biology. Professor Ian Eperon and Dr Cyril Dominguez from the University of Leicester’s Institute of Structural and …

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Synthetic binding protein called "NS1 Monobody" found to inhibit common cancer causing (RAS) mutation

Monobody NS1 binds to H-RAS or K-RAS protein and blocksRAS function by disrupting the protein’s ability to form active molecular pairs. Credit: John P. O’Bryan, et al.  Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have identified a new way to block the action of genetic mutations found in nearly 30 percent of all cancers. Mutations in …

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New approach to treating cancer with therapeutic short interfering RNA (siRNA) delivered by nanohydrogel nanoparticles

A novel targeted therapy using nanoparticles has enabled researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology to purge ovarian tumors in limited, in vivo tests in mice. “The dramatic effect we see is the massive reduction or complete eradication of the tumor, when the ‘nanohydrogel’ treatment is given in combination with existing chemotherapy,” said chief researcher …

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Shift work and sleep habits in men and cancer association shown in a research study

Men who have worked night shifts for more than 20 years, or who work night shifts without daytime napping, or sleep for more than ten hours per night on average may have an increased risk of cancer, according to a study published in Annals of Medicine. The study, led by scientists based at the Huazhong …

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Research identifies protein behind side effects of cellular senescence

Cellular senescence is a state in which normal healthy cells do not have the ability to divide. Senescence can occur when cancer-causing genes are activated in normal cells or when chemotherapy is used on cancer cells. Thus, senescence induces a mechanism that halts the growth of rapidly dividing cells. Once thought to only be beneficial …

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