Research shows possible link between "body clock" and cancer pathogenesis

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) describes an unexpected role for proteins involved with our daily “circadian” clocks in influencing cancer growth. The research, published in the journal Molecular Cell, suggests that disruptions in circadian rhythms might leave levels of an important cancer-linked protein, called cMYC, unchecked. “This appears… Continue reading Research shows possible link between "body clock" and cancer pathogenesis

Research shows possible link between “body clock” and cancer pathogenesis

A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) describes an unexpected role for proteins involved with our daily “circadian” clocks in influencing cancer growth. The research, published in the journal Molecular Cell, suggests that disruptions in circadian rhythms might leave levels of an important cancer-linked protein, called cMYC, unchecked. “This appears… Continue reading Research shows possible link between “body clock” and cancer pathogenesis

Alcohol intake and Melanoma risk

Researchers at Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island found that alcohol intake was associated with higher rates of invasive melanoma among white men and women. White wine carried the most significant association, and the increased risk was greater for parts of the body that receive less sun exposure. The findings… Continue reading Alcohol intake and Melanoma risk

Obese patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are at higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma

New research shows that excess weight increases the risk that a benign blood disorder will progress into multiple myeloma, a cancer of the blood. The study, by a team at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, is published Nov. 18 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Being overweight or obese has… Continue reading Obese patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are at higher risk of progression to multiple myeloma